Pulse nightclub shooting details revealed in new Orlando police report

ORLANDO — A 78-page report from the Orlando Police Department, that was obtained exclusively by the Orlando Sentinel, sheds light on new details from the deadly Pulse nightclub shooting massacre, including information that nearly half of the 49 people killed died on the dance floor.

The report doesn’t make clear whether any of the victims — many of whom were part of Orlando’s queer Latino community — were shot by friendly fire during the three-hour standoff with gunman Omar Mateen, who targeted the gay nightclub, the newspaper reported.

The Orlando publication obtained a copy of the report that has been given out by Orlando Police Chief John Min, who has been traveling the globe to discuss how his department responded to the June 12 shooting  — what they have learned.

The report has the most comprehensive timeline offered by police of the incident thus far and also includes diagrams and still photos from body cam footage showing officers in their initial confrontation with Mateen.

The newspaper reported 20 people were killed on the dance floor, 13 died in the bathrooms while waiting to get medical help, one on the patio, one in the lobby and three on the stage. Also, 11 died after being taken to area hospitals. Another 68 people were injured.

Survivors of the one of the deadliest mass shooting in U.S. history have criticized the Orlando Police Department for waiting too long to go in after Mateen.

Mina said authorities waited because Mateen said he had bombs strapped to victims throughout the club — but none were found, the newspaper reported.

Police also claimed a breakdown in communication between their department and the Orlando Fire Department and Orange County Fire Rescue, which weren’t at police command center, also led to the prolonged time, the newspaper reported.

Officers first responded at 2:02 a.m. after Officer Adam Gruler, who was working an off-duty job at the club, called for backup. There is footage of Gruler firing shots at Mateen, who was standing in the doorway.

About the author

Phillip Zonkel

Award-winning journalist Phillip Zonkel spent 17 years at Long Beach's Press-Telegram, where he was the first reporter in the paper's history to have a beat covering the city's vibrant LGBTQ. He also created and ran the popular and innovative LGBTQ news blog, Out in the 562.

He won two awards and received a nomination for his reporting on the local LGBT community, including a two-part investigation that exposed anti-gay bullying of local high school students and the school districts' failure to implement state mandated protections for LGBT students.