fbpx

Queer Latinx comedian Monica Palacios performs tonight at MOLAA

LONG BEACH — Monica Palacios’ one-woman show, “San Francisco, Mi Amor!,” follows the trajectory of her queer comedy career and activism in San Francisco during the homophobic 1980s.

Palacios performs her show 7 tonight at Long Beach’s Museum of Latin American Art. After the show, Palacios and Anna Sandoval, professor and chair of Cal State Long Beach’s Chicano and Latino Studies.

It was a challenging decade to be a queer Chicana comic as AIDS is front page news, causing mass hysteria and shining a negative light on the LGBTQ community.

Monica Palacios’ one-woman show, “San Francisco, Mi Amor!,” follows the trajectory of her queer comedy career and activism in San Francisco during the homophobic 1980s. Palacios, in a 1980s photo, will perform the show tonight at MOLAA. Photo: Monica Palacios.

In “San Francisco, Mi Amor!,” Palacios uses this bleak page in history as her backdrop for sharing personal stories:

  • Living with her lesbian sister
  • Being a San Francisco State film student
  • Performing at Gay Comedy Night at the Valencia Rose Cabaret
  • Lusting for the women who made her burritos at Taqueria La Cumbre
  • Being a founder of the comedy troupe Culture Clash
  • Meeting and auditioning for Edward James Olmos on 24th Street
  • Grooming her mullet

At the time, San Francisco’s Latino Mission District was a hot spot for Palacios, who performed at what are now queer historical spaces and queer friendly venues:

  • Valencia Rose Cabaret, ground zero for the queer comedy movement
  • Artemis Cafe, a lesbian restaurant and space
  • Amelia’s, a lesbian bar
  • Galeria de La Raza, an art gallery.

Palacios and a handful of LGBTQ comics were bravely performing despite the homophobic atmosphere. Palacios stood out amongst her peers because in one breath, her brand of Chicana lesbian humor focused on nationality and sexuality.

About the author

Phillip Zonkel

Award-winning journalist Phillip Zonkel spent 17 years at Long Beach's Press-Telegram, where he was the first reporter in the paper's history to have a beat covering the city's vibrant LGBTQ. He also created and ran the popular and innovative LGBTQ news blog, Out in the 562.

He won two awards and received a nomination for his reporting on the local LGBTQ community, including a two-part investigation that exposed anti-gay bullying of local high school students and the school districts' failure to implement state mandated protections for LGBTQ students.

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This

Share this post with your friends!