Long Beach Pride 2018: Festival to host teen pride, family fun zone

Long Beach Lesbian and Gay Pride Festival will host a family fun zone both days. These attendees enjoy the 2017 festival. Photo: Long Beach Pride.

LONG BEACH —  A special teen pride and family friendly area will be held at the Long Beach Pride.

The Long Beach Lesbian and Gay Pride Festival will take place May 19 and 20 from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. along Shoreline Drive at between Shoreline Village Drive and Alamitos Avenue at Marina Green and Rainbow Lagoon parks.

Tickets are$20 online and and $25 at the gate.

Long Beach Pride 2018: Festival to include LGBTQ seniors’ area

The Long Beach Lesbian and Gay Pride Parade will step off May 20 at 10:30 a.m. and march west along Ocean Boulevard to Alamitos Avenue.

Teen pride — which is free and will be open to anyone between 13 and 19 years old with ID —  will take place May 18 from 4 to 9 p.m at the festival site. It will feature a talent show, gaming truck, photo booth, DJs, raffles, free food, beverages, and gift bags.

Teens are also welcome to purchase tickets and attend the festival.

The festival’s family fun zone will take place both days from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. and offer a variety of activities for kids and parents, including all-day art murals and making slime.

Youth also are encouraged to register at the festival and help plan next year’s teen pride and family fun zone. Youth will take the lead in organizing both areas with the help of an adult mentor group and community partners who will assist them with budgets, contracts, decorating, and everything else required to  create their own unique space.

About the author

Phillip Zonkel

Award-winning journalist Phillip Zonkel spent 17 years at Long Beach's Press-Telegram, where he was the first reporter in the paper's history to have a beat covering the city's vibrant LGBTQ. He also created and ran the popular and innovative LGBTQ news blog, Out in the 562.

He won two awards and received a nomination for his reporting on the local LGBTQ community, including a two-part investigation that exposed anti-gay bullying of local high school students and the school districts' failure to implement state mandated protections for LGBTQ students.