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Pixar short film ‘Out’ features studio’s first gay character, storyline

Pixar made history Friday with the release of the animated short film “Out” — The first film from Pixar to feature an LGBTQ storyline and a main character who identifies as gay.

The 9-minute film debuted on Disney Plus through its SparkShorts series.

The film follows Greg, who is excited about moving in with his boyfriend, Manuel. But Greg’s happiness is muted a little. He’s nervous because he’s not out to his parents, who unexpectedly stop by the apartment for a visit.

Greg tries to hide evidence of Manuel being his boyfriend, but his fairy god-pets, a magical dog and cat, encourage him to tell his parents the truth.

Pixar Out Short Film

Pixar made history Friday with the release of the animated short film “Out” — The first film from Pixar to feature an LGBTQ storyline and a main character who identifies as gay. Photo: Pixar

While “Out” is a landmark film for Pixar, the Walt Disney Studios — the parent of Pixar and a subsidiary of the Walt Disney Company — has been ranked “poor” or “failing” since 2012 for on-screen LGBTQ representation, according to LGBTQ media advocacy group GLAAD.

The studio has slowly increased its LGBTQ representation recently by including minor LGBTQ representation in “Avengers: Endgame” and “Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker.”

“Out” was directed by Steven Clay Hunter, who also worked on “Finding Nemo” and “WALL-E,” among other Pixar films.

Max Sachar, known for his work on “Coco” and “Toy Story 3” produced the short.

About the author

Phillip Zonkel

Award-winning journalist Phillip Zonkel spent 17 years at Long Beach's Press-Telegram, where he was the first reporter in the paper's history to have a beat covering the city's vibrant LGBTQ. He also created and ran the popular and innovative LGBTQ news blog, Out in the 562.

He won two awards and received a nomination for his reporting on the local LGBTQ community, including a two-part investigation that exposed anti-gay bullying of local high school students and the school districts' failure to implement state mandated protections for LGBTQ students.

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